Cannabis

Legal Cannabis Not Worth Risk for Pregnant Women

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) is concerned that legalization of cannabis may overshadow a growing body of medical research which suggests that the use of cannabis during pregnancy may be associated with the risk of low birth weight, preterm labour, stillbirth and may also negatively impact the developing baby’s brain.

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) is concerned that legalization of cannabis may overshadow a growing body of medical research which suggests that the use of cannabis during pregnancy may be associated with the risk of low birth weight, preterm labour, stillbirth and may also negatively impact the developing baby’s brain.

“Simply put, there is already strong evidence showing that cannabis is not good for the developing teen brain. Why would we think this wouldn’t be the case for the fetal brain?” says Dr. Blake, CEO SOGC. “Current research indicates that cannabis has the potential to cause lifelong harm to a developing fetus in terms of memory function, hyperactive behaviour and an increased risk of anxiety or depression. Why risk it?”

Read: Cannabis Tolerance

 

Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey

The number of Canadian women of reproductive age who report smoking cannabis is increasing. A 2015 Canadian Tobacco Alcohol and Drugs Survey reported that 20.6% of women ages 15-19, 29.7% of women ages 20-24, and almost 10% of women ages 25-plus were cannabis consumers. This reflects an overall jump in female consumption from 7% in 2013 to 10% in 2015. There is concern that these numbers will jump further. When cannabis was first legalized in Colorado in 2014, there was a 23% spike in emergency hospital visits for cannabis-related illnesses in teens ages 13-20.

“Cannabis research has been difficult over the years because the drug has been illegal, and pregnant and breastfeeding women cannot be used in testing. So much of the data that has been reported is based on self-reporting by women who may have been reluctant to disclose accurate usage information,” says Dr. Blake. “If we look at where we were forty years ago when data started to emerge about the risks of alcohol and tobacco in pregnancy, we see definite parallels. We know that the more a woman consumes, the greater risk to her baby, but we don’t know how much is absolutely safe and how much is absolutely harmful – and we may never know.”

 

Recommendation is to avoid cannabis during pregnancy 

The Culture of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) is worried that the legalization of marijuana might overshadow a growing body of clinical study which recommends that the use of cannabis while pregnant may be related to the risk of reduced birth weight, preterm labor, stillbirth, and may likewise adversely influence the developing baby’s mind.

The Society of Obstetricians, as well as Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), is concerned that legalization of marijuana may outweigh an expanding body of clinical research which recommends that the use of marijuana during pregnancy may be connected with the risk of low birth weight, preterm labor, stillbirth as well as may likewise adversely affect the rating child’s mind.

 

Why would certainly we think this wouldn’t be the case for the fetal brain?” states Dr. Blake, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SOGC. “Existing study suggests that marijuana can create long-lasting damage to an establishing fetus in terms of memory function, hyperactive practices, and an increased threat of anxiousness or clinical depression. Why risk it?”

 

Conclusion

The number of Canadian ladies of reproductive age that report smoking marijuana is boosting. A 2015 Canadian Cigarette Alcohol and Medications Survey reported that 20.6% of ladies ages 15-19, 29.7% of ladies ages 20-24, and almost 10% of females ages 25-plus were marijuana consumers. This shows a total enter female intake from 7% in 2013 to 10% in 2015. There is a problem that these numbers will leap even more. When cannabis was first legalized in Colorado in 2014, there was a 23% spike in emergency healthcare facility go to for cannabis-related diseases in teens ages 13-20.

 

So much of the information that has been reported is based upon self-reporting by women that may have hesitated to divulge precise use info,” says We understand that the, even more, a lady takes in, the higher risk to her infant, but we do not know how much is safe and also just how much is unsafe – and we might never know.”

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